Living Lines and Written Rhymes

A lovely accumulation of book reviews, writing articles, quotes, submitted works, and appreciation for the written word, particularly YA fiction, poetry, and journalism.

thatcozybooknook:

Don’t read or buy books you have no interest in simply because you think it will impress others. Reading is supposed to be fun, not stressful.

Don’t turn your nose up at people who have different reading tastes; or at those who prefer e-books to physical ones or paperbacks to hardbacks.

Read what you want, when you want, and how you want.

Be mindful of your bank account in the process.

(via literatureismyutopia)

writeworld:

Writer’s Block
A picture says a thousand words. Write them.
Mission: Write a story, a description, a poem, a metaphor, a commentary, or a critique about this picture. Write something about this picture.
Be sure to tag writeworld in your block!

writeworld:

Writer’s Block

A picture says a thousand words. Write them.

Mission: Write a story, a description, a poem, a metaphor, a commentary, or a critique about this picture. Write something about this picture.

Be sure to tag writeworld in your block!

(via blacksplash)

psyduuuck said: Where does one begin to look for beta readers? Obviously it's necessary to have someone impartial read over your entire thing and give you an honest critique of good points and bad, but where do you FIND the people who are willing, and also qualified, to do that for you? Is there some kind of site that hooks people up with this?

fixyourwritinghabits:

Where to Find Beta Readers

Looking for good beta readers takes time and effort. There is no beta reader directory or one site that lists out every beta reader and their preferences and not every beta reader you find will be willing to critique your work.

Below is a list of sites you could use to begin your search:

Now, before you rush off looking for beta readers, here’s a few tips:

Offer to beta. Critiquing other people’s work makes you a better editor. If you can find someone to exchange writing with, it’s a win-win situation. 

Build connections. Connect with fellow aspiring writers on social media, in forums, through writers conferences, local writing clubs etc. These are people that you can exchange work with. 

Don’t get too caught up with qualifications, especially when you’re asking someone to use their time to critique your work for free. If you’re looking for someone with professional qualifications and editing experience, you should be willing to pay for it. 

Don’t take it personally if a beta reader you send your work to never replies. People get busy, people forget, people won’t click with your writing. Remember that (unless you’ve agreed to beta read for them in return or paid them) they have no obligation to beta read for you if they no longer want to. 

I wish you the best of luck finding a beta reader!

No Plot? No Problem! — Should You Start a Novel From Scratch This November?

lettersandlight:

image

NaNoWriMo season is officially here! How can you prepare for a successful November? By planning your novel, storing up inspiration, or finding a writing partner-in-crime. This week, Chris Baty shares an excerpt from the new-and-improved 2014 edition of No Plot? No Problem! (Check it out in our store, too!)

One of National Novel Writing Month’s rules is that you must start your novel from scratch on Day One of the event. You can bring as many outlines and notes and character maps as you like, but writing any of the book’s actual prose in advance is forbidden. This rule is enforced by legions of invisible guilt-monkeys, which are unleashed every year against those who break the rules.

While this costs NaNoWriMo a pretty penny in guilt-monkeys, it also keeps things fresh and prevents people from sabotaging their productivity by being overly invested in the outcome of their book.

That said, a growing number of NaNoWriMo veterans have been using the month to add 50,000 more words to an existing manuscript. We call them Rebels, and their ranks include many of our published participants…

Read More

bookmania:

The London Magazine’s Short Story Competition has returned for its third year.
To continue its literary history, The London Magazine is constantly looking for new voices. Our competitions provide emerging literary talent with an opportunity for publication and distinguished recognition. The London Magazine is looking for unpublished short stories under 4,000 words from writers across the world.
To know more about the competition, head on to this link for full contest details!

bookmania:

The London Magazine’s Short Story Competition has returned for its third year.

To continue its literary history, The London Magazine is constantly looking for new voices. Our competitions provide emerging literary talent with an opportunity for publication and distinguished recognition. The London Magazine is looking for unpublished short stories under 4,000 words from writers across the world.

To know more about the competition, head on to this link for full contest details!

zebramonkeyalpaca said: Starting point: Hi, I'm hoping to start writing, just for myself, and am wondering if there's a good style to start with? Like a classic format/method to start with so what I'm writing has some structure and direction? Probably a silly question!

writing-questions-answered:

Not a silly question at all!

Stories are usually plot driven or character driven. In plot driven stories, the action happens to the characters and they have to react to it. In character driven stories, the characters create the action through the decisions they make. Character driven stories tend to have looser structures than plot driven, but a good general story structure looks like this:


You can read more about plot and story structure here. :)

“Write. You can’t edit a blank page.”

—   Michelle Madow

“Show me a family of readers, and I will show you the people who move the world.”

Anonymous said: what are your thoughts on people using family/friends/people in their lives for writing material?

danieltoumine:

i think it’s inevitable